Quetzalpápalotl
Tú Serás Melón y Yo Seré Sandía
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Bárbara. 18. México.

This is a personal blog where I post and reblog about me, fandoms, history and anything I find interesting.

Feel free to speak to me if you wish so. Let's be friends!

but Solomon calls you Compassion, and that is the most beautiful of all your names.



enjoybeingmuslim:

Just when the caterpillar thinks the world is coming to an end, Allah makes it a butterfly!









We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty.


Maya Angelou (via thelittleyellowdiary)



printed-ink:

Nabokov’s Drawings:

“The drawings of butterflies done by Vladimir Nabokov were intended for “family use.” He made these on title pages of various editions of his works as a gift to his wife and son and sometimes to other relatives. In Brian Boyd’s words, “in these highly personal and affectionately playful drawings the scientific accuracy Nabokov needed in thousands of illustrations of the specimens he studied under the microscope was no longer relevant, and his imagination could take flight. In the butterflies Nabokov devised and labeled for Vera he mingles fact and fancy even more sportively than in his fiction.”

None of these drawings portray real butterflies, both the images and the names he assigns to them are his invention. The names often have some connection to the book that the butterflies adorn and, in most cases,  play on words in English and Russian is used: “Paradisia radugaleta”, “Verinia verae”, to name just a few.”

(via Nabokov Museum)


Adam Marshall Photography
Tumblr | Facebook |  Flickr


design-is-fine:

Franz de Hamilton, Pflanzenstillleben auf Waldboden, late 17th century. Fischer auctions





warm-cider:

My Butterfly, My Pelvis

Krisaya Luenganantakul

Krisaya Luenganantakul is an artist from Thailand and my art class was fortunate enough to have her as a guest speaker today.

When she spoke about this piece she said that people had a misconception that women are fragile. So she used the pelvic bone, the bone that helps cradle the baby before it’s born, as a sign of strength. This bone combined with the butterflies and flowers helps to convey the message that women are beautiful and strong.

You can see more of her art here